The Week of Anticipation

In a week I will be downloading Avid Media Composer 5.0. I’ve been delaying all edits of H.264 files. I have a batch of XDCAM files ready to test. I already have a client convinced we will use Avid on the next project instead of FCP because it is being shot on a 7D and the workflow will be faster. What other new tricks will I be able to conjure up in the “old dogs” software known as Avid.

On a small shoot yesterday, a client called me in to make sure this camera crew she hired was getting all the coverage and types of shots she wanted to see during our edit. I asked them about software preferences in editorial. It’s all FCP. All HDV. That sounds just like a big headache to me. Why not move with something faster workflow wise to save time and money? You know, the opportunity cost of the workflow?

I had lunch with an agency in Salt Lake City two weeks ago. After talking about a small piece I had edited, I showed them the piece on my laptop. “Is this color corrected already? It looks great!”

Avid Media Composer 5.0 Features I’m Excited About

I work from home about 50% of the time. I do all of that work off of a MacBook Pro. I would love to invest in a nice Mac Pro setup, but whenever I do hard core work I get brought into an office with a nice Symphony system or FCP suite. All in all, I am very excited about the new Media Composer software because it gives me a few reasons to tell clients that it would be more efficient to use Avid instead of FCP for once.

Now, I am not going to dive in deep to analyze everything possible, as I was not able to attend NAB and therefore have not tried the software out myself. These are just some thoughts I’ve had over the past couple days.

1) Editing H.264 and ProRes. HDSLR footage, come my way please. I tend to edit 1-2 pieces a week shot on the 7D and this just makes me excited. I can spend more time on the editing and less time on converting the footage to Pro Res before it comes into the system. Good feature for us flat rate payment guys. And then ProRes, really? Great. I’ll take it. I usually use ProRes as something to convert footage that isn’t editing well (H.264) on timelines so I only use it when its HDV or shot on a HDSLR.